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The Great Barrier Reef is losing its ability to bounce back from disturbances

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Climate Change And Coral Reefs, Coral Reefs, Environment, Great Barrier Reef, Impact Of Climate Change, Marine Ecosystems, Ocean Acidification, Ocean Warming, Oceans And Climate Change, Water Pollution According to a study published in the journal Science Advances this month, the Great Barrier Reef is losing its ability to bounce back from disturbances like coral bleaching, crown of thorns starfish outbreaks, and cyclones.A team of researchers led by scientists at Australia’s University of Queensland (UQ) found that, during the 18-year period between 1992 to 2010, the coral recovery rate of reefs in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park declined by an average of 84 percent.This impaired recovery ability is likely due to the succession of acute disturbances the reef has experienced as well as the ongoing impacts of chronic pressures like poor water quality and climate change, researchers found. But the study’s authors also say that effective local management strategies could help restore the reef’s capacity to recover. Prior to the back-to-back bleaching events that hit the Great Barrier Reef in 2016 and 2017, the UNESCO World Heritage Site had suffered two other bouts of extensive bleaching in the past two decades, one in 1998 and another in 2002.The damage done to the Great Barrier Reef by those bleaching events was worrying enough for scientists, and now new research finds that in the intervening years the reef system recovered at a much slower rate than it has in the past. According to a study published in the journal Science Advances this month, the Great Barrier Reef is losing its ability to bounce back from disturbances like coral bleaching, crown of thorns starfish outbreaks, and cyclones.This impaired recovery ability is likely due to the succession of acute disturbances the reef has experienced as well as the ongoing impacts of chronic pressures like poor water quality and climate change, researchers found. But the study’s authors also say that effective local management strategies could help restore the reef’s capacity to recover.A team of researchers led by scientists at Australia’s University of Queensland (UQ) found that, during the 18-year period between 1992 to 2010, the coral recovery rate of reefs in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park declined by an average of 84 percent.Reefs experiencing flood and poor water quality. Photo Credit: Peter Mumby.“This is the first time a decline in recovery rate of this magnitude has been identified in coral reefs,” the study’s lead author, Juan Ortiz of The Australian Institute of Marine Sciences and UQ’s School of Biological Sciences, said in a statement. “The future of the Great Barrier Reef is threatened without further local management to reduce chronic disturbances and support recovery, and strong global action to limit the effect of climate change.”The team determined that the reduction in average recovery rates for six major coral groups ranged from 68 to 143 percent. In other words, some groups went from positive to negative growth rates and there was actually a net decline in those types of coral between disturbance events. “Two of the coral groups — branching Acropora and Montipora — had negative average recovery rates by the end of the study period,” the researchers write in the study.Recovery rates were widely variable across the Great Barrier Reef, however, with reefs in some regions not showing any decline in recovery rates whatsoever. Per the study: “In most cases, recovery rates were less negatively affected in the mid-northern and Swains region of the [Great Barrier Reef].”The authors note that unequivocally establishing which mechanisms are responsible for the Great Barrier Reef being slow to recover in recent decades would require conducting prohibitively large-scale and difficult experiments. But they catalog a number of causes for declining coral growth rates:“Rates of calcification and growth have declined by 14% in some species, such as Porites, in response to rising thermal stress. Further, ocean acidification is likely to have reduced net reef calcification on the southern [Great Barrier Reef] corals. Growth can also be depressed for several years after bleaching events, and some corals shuffle their symbiont populations during thermal stress events, increasing the abundance of thermally tolerant symbiont types. While these symbionts can tolerate high temperatures, their dominance can reduce the growth of their coral hosts by up to 70%.”Healthy coral reef after recovery. Photo Credit: Peter Mumby.Professor Peter Mumby of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at UQ, a co-author of the study, said that the declining recovery capacity of the Great Barrier Reef is particularly concerning given that the impacts of climate change on reefs will only be further exacerbated as the oceans continue to heat up.“As identified in our results, climate change is already affecting coral recovery rate both chronically and through the legacy effect of acute thermal events,” the team states in the study. “Our analysis suggests that recovery rates are expected to decline further under climate change and ocean acidification because of impacts on coral recruitment and growth. Thus, we echo many other calls for urgent action to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and maintain functioning ecosystems.”But Mumby also underlined the importance of the team’s finding that not all reefs are failing to recover from recent disturbances. He and his co-authors write in the study that while they “anticipate that average coral cover will decline, the striking spatial variability in recovery rate implies that some reefs will continue to function far better than others. Understanding the causes of this variability is important and will help target management actions and the delivery of ecosystem services through the identification of reefs/regions, where the ecological benefits of local management action can be maximized.”Mumby said in a statement that he believes there is reason to hope that improved management can help restore the Great Barrier Reef: “Our results indicate that coral recovery is sensitive to water quality, and is suppressed for several years following powerful cyclones. Some reefs could improve their recovery ability if the quality of the water entering the reef is actively improved.”The good news is that models have shown recovery rates can respond quickly to reductions in stressors such as poor water quality, a finding the researchers said is consistent with the fast recovery times observed on some reefs in the central and southern Great Barrier Reef since their study was completed.“A combination of local management actions to reduce chronic disturbances and global action to limit the effect of climate change is urgently required to sustain [Great Barrier Reef] coral cover and diversity,” they write.Reefs experiencing moderate levels of sediment deposition. Photo Credit: Peter Mumby.CITATION• Ortiz, J. C., Wolff, N. H., Anthony, K. R., Devlin, M., Lewis, S., & Mumby, P. J. (2018). Impaired recovery of the Great Barrier Reef under cumulative stress. Science Advances, 4(7), eaar6127. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aar6127 FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Land restoration makes progress in Ethiopia

first_imgArticle published by Genevieve Belmaker In Meket – a district in Ethiopia’s Amhara National Regional State (ANRS) – efforts are underway to restore what experts say is one of the more severely deforested and degraded regions in the country.Of the land in ANRS, less than 2 percent forested land remains, and efforts are underway to restore degraded and deforested areas.In 2016, Ethiopia turned to forestry sector development projects in the form of short rotation planting and rehabilitation of degraded lands in ANRS and other districts. DEBRETABOR, Ethiopia – At a tree nursery in Ethiopia’s Meket district, young men and women pack small plastic bags with soil. The indigenous and exotic species grown here were previously sown directly into the earth, but the growth efficiency was less than 50 percent, according to Melak Dagnew, a forest development project coordinator in the country’s Meket district.With the introduction of the plastic bags, into which the seedlings are first planted, and a consistent regimen of post-plantation care — watering, weeding, adding compost — the efficiency rate has risen to 93 percent, Dagnew says, and the trees have grown as much as 5 meters (16 feet) in just a year.“Soil erosion, land degradation and, as a result, a reduction of productivity were observed widely,” says Dagnew. Meket is one of the four districts in Ethiopia’s Amhara National Regional State (ANRS) where land restoration pilot projects are being carried out.“The lack of forest products like fuelwood, wood for fencing and housing purposes for the community were observed because of population increase followed by the consumption of natural forests in a short period of time,” he said.Known for its densely populated highlands and rain-dependent agriculture, the ANRS is one of the more severely deforested and degraded regions in the country. Recent studies show that out of 157,000 square kilometers (60,600 square miles) of land, less than 2 percent is covered by forest.An analysis of forest coverage by Ethiopia’s Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Climate Change found that nearly 12,000 square kilometers (4,600 square miles) of forest — an area half the size of the island of Sicily — was lost between 2000 and 2013.Students of the church live in small huts around the church’s land. Photo by Maheder Haileselassie Tadese for Mongabay.Only 2,460 square kilometers (950 square miles) of forest cover was gained, making the forest sector one of the top contributors to domestic greenhouse gas emissions. By pledging to restore 150,000 square kilometers (58,000 square miles) of its degraded and deforested land by 2025, an area half the size of Arizona, Ethiopia has joined the global movement toward forest landscape restoration, or FLR.Just over a fifth of that figure, or 34,000 square kilometers (13,100 square miles), has recently been identified as suitable for reforestation.Native vs. non-native treesThe landscape in Meket district is rugged and highly degraded, and ranges in altitude from 1,200 to 3,000 meters (3,900 to 9,800 feet). Since 2016, it’s been among the districts where forestry sector development projects have been implemented in the form of short rotation planting and rehabilitation of degraded lands.The species planted here include the naturally occurring African juniper (Juniperus procera), wild olive (Olea africana) and flat top acacia (Acacia abyssinica). Non-native varieties include Tasmanian bluegum (Eucalyptus globulus), river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) and Mexican cypress (Cupressus lusitanica).Of the indigenous seedlings that are planted, 35 percent are fast-growing species and 30 percent are slow-growth varieties. Despite the considerable effort being invested to promote native plants, farmers who need fuelwood for income and for construction purposes favor non-native plants like eucalyptus, which reach maturity for cutting quickly and can grow back up to four times faster than some native species after the initial cut.Part of a secured land for restoration in Meket, Amhara region. Photo by Maheder Haileselassie Tadese for Mongabay.But this expediency comes at a cost. Eucalyptus trees are known to affect soil conditions, groundwater and the overall biological diversity of the areas in which they occur. Yet despite this, studies show that 90 percent of plantations in Ethiopia are covered by these species, favored for their fast-growing nature, rotation periods and market demand.Tree selection isn’t the only challenge facing the reforestation effort. Other factors identified by researchers earlier this year include weed infestations and the spread of grazing and farmland. Shallow soil depths and scarcity of moisture in Meket district have also been obstacles.On the other hand, the reforestation projects have hindered the free movement of area locals and their livestock herds.In total, 165 square kilometers (64 square miles) from four restoration sites and 12 square kilometers (4.6 square miles) from half a dozen plantation sites have been undertaken in the last two to three years in Meket district alone. After the progress here and in other forestry sector development projects, the scope has grown. An initial slate of nine projects has expanded to 54 nationwide. The Amhara region remains at the forefront, with 24 reforestation projects.A way forwardMainly dependent on agriculture, Ethiopia’s economy is highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Already it has suffered from recurring droughts and food security woes. The government has taken several steps toward combating these impacts, including the launch of the Climate Resilient Green Economy (CRGE) policy in 2011, aimed at building a zero-net-emissions economy by 2030 while maintaining the high growth rate needed to attain middle-income status by 2025.This October, the Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Climate Change launched a 10-year road map for the forest sector, in collaboration with several nongovernmental partner institutions.Perimeter of Debresena church near Debretabor, Ethiopia. Photo by Maheder Haileselassie Tadese for Mongabay.Tefera Mengistu, a coordinator for the ministry’s Forest Sector Development Program, said five pillars were included in the road map: enabling environment; sustainable forest production and value chain; forest and rural livelihood; forest and environmental functions; and forest and urban greening. Unlike REDD+, which focuses mainly on reducing emissions from degradation and deforestation, the road map is concerned about the forest sector in general.Land restoration and improvement of biodiversity get due emphasis under the pillar of forest and environmental functions, aimed at meeting the country’s commitment for the restoration of 150,000 square kilometers of land.An alternative hope for farmersJust outside the plant nursery, Asrat Haile, 61, weeds his farm where he hopes in a few months to start harvesting teff, the food grain used to make injera, Ethiopia’s national dish. To supplement his income, Haile also works as a security guard for one of the restoration sites in Meket district. Since it’s a rural area, it’s common for people to take a side job to gain more income.Farmers cut grass and shrub fodder for their livestock. Photo by Maheder Haileselassie Tadese for Mongabay.“All this terrain had no tree coverage and was severely degraded. But it’s coming back to life now that the project started.” Haile says, recalling the floods that followed during the rainy season because of the eroded soil and the severely degraded mountainous landscape. “I no longer see the water coming down.”He and other farmers who make up to 61 percent of the earned income in the district are excited that the project includes many people living in poverty and creates employment opportunities. They plant the seedlings grown in the nurseries, both native and non-native trees. As the trees take root in their woodlots, they serve both as a source of fuelwood and timber, and as shade to rest under. Thousands of young men and women are now employed at sites for pitting, planting, watering and other post-plantation management.In an effort to reduce wood cutting for fuel and construction purposes, the project has distributed hundreds of fuel-saving stoves and solar lights to households that have demonstrated the best performance throughout the project activities. The project also allows livestock farmers to enter areas secured for restoration to collect grass and shrubs for fodder during the January-May dry season.There are other benefits.On a nearby hill covered with bright yellow indigenous flowers locally known as adey abebaBidens macroptera), trained farmers gather at a beekeeping site that’s part of the reforestation project. They are able to produce up to 10 kilograms (22 pounds) of honey each year from a single hive.“People were skeptical of the project at first,” says Dagnew, the project coordinator. “Drought and intensive grazing were identified to be major problems.” It took numerous discussions with the community before a mutual understanding was reached and the local people started to accept the projects.They represent not just an economic advantage for the farmers, surrounded by harsh terrain, but also protection for the land against erosion and flooding. That also improves crop yield and productivity along the way.The role of the churchThe Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church has more than 40 million followers and over 35,000 churches all over the country, known for the old forests that envelop them. Even as the rest of the country consistently lost forest coverages over decades, it is in the vicinity of these churches where more than 200 of its last surviving indigenous tree species and remaining biodiversity are found.Alemayheu Wassie, a leading researcher on the topic of church forests, was born and raised in the Amhara region’s South Gondar zone, where there are more than 1,400 church forests. He began his research in 2002 and has since then published more than 20 scientific papers focusing on the conservation and restoration of church forests. Five years ago, he led a project to build walls around or mark for protection 15 church forests carefully selected based on their high biodiversity and indigenous species.One of these churches stands atop a hill in South Gondar. Known as Debresena it was established in the first half of the 16th century. The church forest contains 34 different tree species on just 11.5 hectares (28 acres) of land. But until a recent demarcation measure undertaken by Wassie and his team, it had been under severe pressure from intensive livestock grazing. This was followed by the planting of eucalyptus trees to replace the dominant indigenous trees such as hachitu (Dicrocephala integrifolia) and maget (Trifolium sp.).Seedlings planted and grown in plastic bags have a high success rate. Photo by Maheder Haileselassie Tadese for Mongabay.“Upon consultation with the community, we found the construction of stone walls on the perimeter of the church to be the easiest way of protecting the forest,” Wassie says. Stone walls are preferred because materials are easily available, there is potential for plants to grow in between the stones, and they are tough for cattle to push down. Whenever stone is unavailable for building walls, an artificial demarcation between the roads and farmlands and the church forest is used.Once the area closure or demarcation is done, the local people are reluctant to encroach. As a result, a visible difference in terms of both quality and forest coverage area has developed. The difference is especially stark when compared to other church forests in the area where demarcation measures were not taken.Forests have long been an important companion of the churches. They signify the dignity and prestige of the church and provide a tranquil atmosphere for the hermits and monks who live and contemplate in them. Many churches are built on hills, and the forest surrounding them helps to prevent wind and floods. Additionally, in early Ethiopian and church history, inks made from roots, leaves and flowers of various plants were used to draw paintings and produce books.Changing timesAccording to Wassie, intensive livestock grazing and the increased need of farmers for more land to plow are the two major factors endangering the church forests of Ethiopia. The former hampers the regeneration of seeds by leaving no room for new trees to replace older ones, while the latter significantly reduces the forest coverage area.With his persistent efforts and funding from the Florida-based Tree Foundation, Wassie was able to enclose more than a dozen churches in South Gondar. However, he says he’s concerned that, despite his repeated appeals, both church and government administrations won’t pay heed to the conservation and restoration work needed for church forests.But there are also churches that are focused mainly on rotation plantation and self-sustainability, in addition to conserving what’s already there. Tsegur Michael Church is one of the many found in South Gondar that was established hundreds of years ago.Melakesahel Kindu Kassahun, 52, is head of the church and the person in charge of overseeing all the decisions regarding the forest at Tsegur Michael. He says that 20 years ago the church asked the community for the surrounding land. The local people agreed, even though they grazed their cattle on the land.Part of a Eucalpytus tree. Photo by Maheder Haileselassie Tadese for Mongabay.Since then, the church has busied itself with planting eucalyptus for sale. The income generated from these trees pays for the salaries of the clergy and the purchase of items for the church, thus making the church self-sustaining and productive.In addition to eucalyptus, they also plant trees Mexican cypress and grevillea that have a longer life cycle. The difference is that the trees for sale are planted outside the main compound of the church, because no cutting is permitted inside.“It was first fenced to provide protection for the graveyard,” Kassahun says. Today, the fence that was meant to protect the dead has given life to the forest within.Once a year after the completion of the Sunday mass service, an announcement is made for the farmers, reminding them to participate on terrace work at the plantation site, starting with the sections that are prone to erosion. This is followed by planting trees.Unlike the conservation projects initiated by government policies and various nonprofit organizations in many parts of the country, the work that goes on at many of these church forests are initiated by the church and the community itself.“[Church] forests are stepping stones and boot disks for the land restoration work that’s currently happening in different parts of the country.” Wassie says. “They will be the starting point if we wish to restore our previous natural forest.” Degraded Lands, Forests, Land Use Change, Landscape Restoration, Montane Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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JRU remains unbeaten, keeps Letran winless

first_imgAi-Ai delas Alas on Jiro Manio: ‘Sana pinahalagahan niya ang naitulong ko’ JRU held a 76-66 lead late in the fourth but the Knights managed to mount an 8-2 run to cut the lead to four, 78-74, after Rey Nambatac hit a transition triple at the 1:11 mark.Gio Lasquety, however, would put the breaks on Letran’s effort after he hit a baseline jumper at the 55.2-second mark of the game to give JRU an 80-74 advantage.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnSPORTSBreak new groundDespite the win, JRU head coach Vergel Meneses said they can never be complacent while holding a lead down the stretch especially against the Knights who are capable of pushing for a comeback.“We got too many mistakes and they thought that Letran would never recover, Letran has come back many times now when they were down,” said Meneses. “Letran has a ‘never-say-die’ attitude so whenever you let your guard down those players will attack.” Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netJose Rizal University remained unbeaten in the Filoil Flying V Preseason Premier Cup after coming away with an 82-74 victory over Letran Friday at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.The Heavy Bombers improved to 3-0 to tie Lyceum of the Philippines University atop Group A while the Knights languish at the bottom with a 0-3 card.ADVERTISEMENT Presidency bid needs ‘deep reflection’ – Sara Duterte Indonesia pummels Singapore to open Seaba Bulacan town gears up for biggest cookie jar Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Taal Volcano evacuees warned against going home Palace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikelycenter_img MJ Dela Virgen led JRU with 17 points, going 100 percent from inside the arc, to go along five rebounds.Lasquety and Teytey Teodoro provided the offensive punch off the bench as they put up 12 and 11 points, respectively.Rey Nambatac had a game-high 25 points, to go along six boards and, three steals to lead the Knights.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES MOST READ View comments Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend Ex-Bulacan town vice mayor, village chief shot dead For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Wildlife rescuers asked to turn over animals to DENRlast_img read more

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Froome’s teammate Thomas crashes out of Tour de France

first_imgEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend Thomas began the stage second overall, 12 seconds behind Froome, despite having crashed in several other stages, including Stage 8 on Saturday, when he tumbled over a barrier on a descent.It’s been an unfortunate year for Thomas, who also exited the Giro d’Italia in May following a crash caused by a police motorbike.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’Several other riders also crashed in the 181.5-kilometer (113-mile) stage from Nantua to Chambery.Robert Gesink of Team Lotto Jumbo and Manuele Mori of UAE Team Emirates were also forced to abandon. View comments Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Solar-powered barge a key ‘interceptor’ for plastic waste LATEST STORIES Valtteri Bottas wins Austrian GP; Sebastian Vettel second Jean-Paul Gaultier to retire as fashion designer Imee Marcos slams driver-cap on motorcycle taxis Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img Britain’s Chris Froome, wearing the overall leader’s yellow jersey, talks to a team BMC rider during the eighth stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 187.5 kilometers (116.5 miles) with start in Dole and finish in Station des Rousses, France, Saturday, July 8, 2017. (Photo by PETER DEJONG / AP)CHAMBERY, France — Geraint Thomas has crashed on a descent and been taken to a local hospital with a suspected broken collarbone, depriving Chris Froome of a key Sky teammate as he seeks a fourth Tour de France title.Thomas went down on a slick road coming off the Col de la Biche with slightly more than 100 kilometers (60 miles) remaining in Stage 9 – which is considered one of the race’s toughest.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Pornography greets commuters at Sweden bus stop Not easy being green: Dog births unique puppy McGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC return Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Missile-capable frigate BRP Jose Rizal inches closer to entering PH Navy’s fleet Painting found in Italian museum wall is stolen Klimtlast_img read more

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1,200 athletes for JTA/Sagicor meet

first_imgAs many as 1,200 of the best athletes from the 7-15 age group will be on show at the National Stadium on June 2 and 3 for the 34th staging of the Jamaica Teachers’ Association (JTA)-Sagicor National Athletics Championships. Title sponsors Sagicor will pump $6 million into the meet. The sponsorship includes two five-year secondary level scholarships for the champion boy and girl. The scholarships will be provided through the Sagicor Foundation. Mark Chisholm, executive vice-president, Sagicor Life, Individual Life Insurance division, said his company remains committed to the meet. “We recognise and see the value it adds to the life of all who are involved – the student athletes, coaches, organisers, sponsors, teachers, parents and peers,” Chisholm said at Thursday’s launch at the JTA office on Church Street in Kingston. He added: “This championship has been the platform for exposing the talent of so many of our athletes who have gone on to have long and successful careers as track superstars. To name a few – the fastest man in the world Usain Bolt, our pocket rocket Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and the great Yohan Blake.” MINISTER’S COMMENDATION Guest speaker, Minister of State in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information Floyd Green, commended JTA and Sagicor for their commitment to the meet. “Jamaica is well known for athletics and we continue to produce stars because companies like Sagicor invest from this level. We realise that development starts early,” the junior minister said. Chairman of the National Sports Committee, Colin Spence, said the meet for students from Primary, All-Age and Junior High schools is “special”. “The meet is special as the only national meet of its kind in the world, where students age 7-15 qualify to run at the National Stadium. We will showcase 1,200 of the best students from the parishes. We are about exposing athletes,” Spence explained. St Andrew are the defending champions. Last year they scored 359.5 points to emerge as overall winners. The meet’s associate sponsors include JTA Co-op Credit Union, National Baking Company, LASCO IDrade, JP Tropical Foods, JTA Publishing House, Lithographic Printery, TIP Friendly Society, Art and Fabric and Brawta Sports.last_img read more

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Holmes primed for Canada clash against Crowley

first_img HOLMES CAMP UPBEAT Richard ‘Frog’ Holmes, who was one of the semi-finalists in this year’s Wray and Nephew Contender show, left Jamaica on Wednesday for Montreal, Canada, for a junior middleweight fight against Canadian, Cody Crowley tomorrow night, at the Memorial Centre, in Peterborough. This will be the main bout on a six-fight card being promoted by Tyler Buxton, the man who was responsible for the Canadian team of boxers that appeared in the Contender show this year. Buxton told The Gleaner recently that he has been very pleased with the rapport that has developed between him and the Jamaican boxing fraternity and that he hopes to arrange regular fights between boxers from both countries. “This will be an important fight for Holmes, and if he wins and looks good, it could mean other fights for him in Canada,” Buxton added. He also pointed out that another Jamaican boxer, Devon Moncriffe will be fighting on a card that he is promoting in Canada on October 21. The Holmes camp was upbeat when they spoke with The Gleaner before leaving, and said that they were going into the fight confident of victory. Holmes’ trainer Carl Grant, said that he was very pleased the way Holmes had gone about his training over the past several weeks. He gave high praise to Sakima Mullings, the 2017 Contender champion and former Bruising Gym stable-mate of Holmes, for what he hailed as top sparring support. “Sakima stepped up to the plate and really gave Holmes some good workouts,” said Grant, who also pointed out that they also had some sparring sessions with Moncriffe and could not ask for anything more. “Richard is well prepared and only has to deliver now.” Crowley, who goes into the ring with an impressive 12-0 record, is reported to be a fighter, who moves a lot and uses his speed as one of his best offensive weapons. He is a southpaw, and tapes of his previous fights show that he is busy from the first bell and never stops moving. The answer to that Holmes says is to slow him down, and that is exactly what he expects to do. Holmes will climb into the ring with a 15-7 record, that includes nine victories by knockout and technical knockout, and this shows that he does have the power to stop his opponent. His major drawback is that he tends to fade in the later rounds of his fights, but this is expected to improve, Grant said, with a mixture of hard work, in and outside the ring, and fighting smarter. The final word from the camp when they ended sparring on Monday was: “We have put in the work, we are ready, and we intend to come back to Jamaica next week with a victory.”last_img read more

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Madrid downplay UCL experience

first_imgMADRID (AP):Real Madrid are entering today’s Champions League final with the attitude that the past means nothing.According to coach Zinedine Zidane, the fact that the Spanish giants are two-time defending champions, playing in their third straight final and have a chance to win a fourth title in five seasons will be totally irrelevant when they take on Liverpool in Kiev.”We are prepared,” Zidane said earlier this week. “But not because we have more experience. That doesn’t mean anything. It’s another game. We have to go out and show that we want to win it.”Madrid are also the most successful team in European Cup history with 12 titles and 15 finals. While many in Madrid’s squad have already won three Champions League titles, most in Liverpool’s team have never made it to a final.The only Liverpool player with a Champions League trophy is Emre Can, who was with Bayern Munich – although he didn’t play much – when they won the European title in 2013.”It doesn’t matter that we won it last year and that they haven’t made it to a final in 11 years,” Zidane said. “We will give all we have.”Liverpool last played in the Champions League final in 2007, when they lost to AC Milan. They won their fifth – and most recent – European title in 2005, also against Milan.”We’ve won the last two finals so it may seem something easy to do, but we know that it’s not,” said Madrid left back Marcelo, a three-time Champions League winner. “We know how hard it is to go through each training session and each game. It’s tough to make it to the final and we are determined to win it.”Marcelo is one of the 12 Madrid players trying to win the competition for the fourth time. Cristiano Ronaldo can lift his fifth Champions League trophy, as he also won it with Manchester United in 2008.last_img read more

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Hetmyer half-century trumps Gayle’s as Amazon Warriors win

first_imgGEORGETOWN, Guyana, (CMC): Dashing left-hander Shimron Hetmyer transferred his already immense powers into the Twenty20 format, smashing an audacious unbeaten half-century to carry Guyana Amazon Warriors to a comfortable six-wicket win over Chris Gayle’s St Kitts and Nevis Patriots here on Thursday night. Gayle’s 86 from 65 deliveries had helped Patriots to 146 for five off their 20 overs after being sent in at the Guyana National Stadium in the second match of the Caribbean Premier League. And though Amazon Warriors slumped to 24 for three inside the first three overs of their run chase, the 21-year-old Hetmyer counter-attacked with an astonishing 79 from just 45 balls in only his fourth T20 to deliver victory for the home side with 21 balls remaining. Nepalese leg-spinner Sandeep Lamichhane (2-12) and left-arm quick Sheldon Cottrell (2-21) rocked Amazon Warriors to put the game in limbo. Cottrell bowled Luke Ronchi without scoring with a full length delivery at the end of the first over and off the first ball of the next over, Lamichhane claimed the other opener, Chadwick Walton, for nine, caught at mid-on. When captain Shoaib Malik feathered a catch to the keeper in Cottrell’s second over for 14, Amazon Warriors were reeling. However, Hetmyer arrived to transform the contest in a hurry, belting nine fours and four sixes to overpower the Patriots’ attack. He dominated a 62-run fourth-wicket stand with Jason Mohammed (16) and then took Amazon Warriors over the line in an unbroken 62-run, fifth wicket stand with Chris Green who finished on 25 not out. Hetmyer ripped into West Indies teammate Alzarri Joseph in the fifth over, which leaked 20 runs before raising his maiden T20 half-century in the 11th over off 29 balls. Ben Cutting felt his wrath in the 16th over, hammered for two fours and a six, and Hetmyer fittingly ended the game by smashing Joseph straight for four in the next over. Veteran Gayle had earlier threatened to notch his 22nd T20 hundred, but he perished in the penultimate over, leaving Patriots short of a really competitive total. All told, Gayle struck seven fours and five sixes but failed to get support as no other batsman passed 20. However, he added 61 with Top Cooper (15) for the second wicket after Evin Lewis fell cheaply for one in the fourth over and put on another 43 for the third wicket with Cutting. With three figures in sight, Gayle holed out in the deep to a brilliant running catch by 19-year-old Guyanese Sherfane Rutherford off South African leg-spinner Imran Tahir. Windies seamer Keemo Paul was the best bowler with two for 16 from his four overs. 62-run fourth-wicketlast_img read more

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Top-ranked Djokovic, Halep honoured by ITF as World Champions

first_imgLONDON (AP): Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep were named the 2018 World Champions by the International Tennis Federation (ITF) yesterday after each won Grand Slam titles and finished the year atop the world rankings. Djokovic, recognised by the ITF for the sixth time, won the Wimbledon and US Open titles a year after undergoing surgery on his right elbow. “I am particularly proud of this achievement after all that I’ve been through physically this year, but part of me always believed I could make it back to the top,” Djokovic says. Halep, who won the French Open in June, earned the honour for the first time despite being unable to compete at the WTA Finals because of a back injury. “To be recognised in this way is really special and provides extra motivation to keep working for next season,” Halep says. Mike Bryan and Jack Sock were named the winners in men’s doubles, and Barbora Krejcikova and Katerina Siniakova claimed the women’s doubles honour. The champions are determined by the ITF according to a system that weighs each player’s results during the calendar year.last_img read more

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ECD teen to represent Guyana at National Qaseeda Competition in Suriname

first_imgFourteen-year-old Nawaz Hamid Khan of Marty’s Ville, Mon Repos, East Coast Demerara, and a student of Cummings Lodge Secondary School, is one Guyana’s young blooming Qaseeda singers.He has been singing since he was seven years old and has developed a voice that everyone enjoys. This talented singer has performed at many functions with the most recent being at the Bath Settlement Mosque in the semi-finals of the National Qaseeda Competition.At that competition, he placed first and earned the opportunity to represent Guyana at the International Qaseeda competition slated for Suriname on October 21.From now, leading up to the competition, the young man will continue to focus on his pieces and is optimistic that he will be successful. Apart from singing, he also teaches the art form to the children in his community.Nawaz Khan is inspired by Atif Aslam’s renditions; one of the greatest artistes in the world from Pakistan. He credits his success to his parents – Abdul Hamid and Nalima Nesha and the Al-Fasailiah Foundation Nasheed Group of which he is a Mureed (member).He is the youngest of three siblings who love to play cricket. His favourite food is dhal and rice with curried beef while his favourite colour is red. As a young singer, he advises his peers to follow their dreams and be the person they want to become.He also encourages them to be themselves and always aim for the stars. Nawaz can be followed on Facebook and Instagram as Nawaz Khan.last_img read more

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