Category: iadsknjd

No to Ramjattan’s 3rd term

first_imgDear Editor,The leader of the Alliance For Change (AFC) Khemraj Ramjattan continues to justify that the AFC constitution is silent about a third term and therefore it’s his democratic right that a Third Term “ought” to be bestrode upon him at the National Conference; however, this argument can be extended further because the Alliance For Change falls under the Friendly Society Act under the Constitution of Guyana, where there is no provision for Third Terms.Ramjattan has done a splendid job as leader for the Alliance For Change, so I remind him that his contribution was outstanding, but it’s time for others to contribute towards the development of the party and the mentality that without Ramjattan, AFC would be dead. That will never happen because there are other leaders who are also capable and who could take the party into the future.As it relates to the Rotation Principle, most successful governments with democratic principles remove its leaders after two terms, that is the norm Worldwide except for the countries with dictators who refused to move and misused their countries’ constitution to remain continually and, my friend, you are not Robert Gabriel Mugabe, the Zimbabwean Dictator for life, so let the harmony of the Party continue and brotherhood as we host a successful National Conference.Yours truly,Pradeep Bachalast_img read more

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Land Rights Bill Receives Support from the Legislature

first_imgIt was interactive, it was informative, and it was quite rewarding. On Friday March 27, 2015, the Land Commission held a retreat for select members of the National Legislature on the draft Land Rights Bill.The retreat took place at the Fairground in Buchanan and brought together members of the House and Senate Standing Committees on Lands, Mines and Energy, Natural Resources and Environment, Internal Affairs, Judiciary and Executive.Buchanan City Mayor, Hon. Julia K. Bono Mellish, welcomed the officials to the City of Buchanan and wished them fruitful deliberations.In his opening remarks, the Chairman of the Land Commission, Dr. Cecil T. O. Brandy told the Lawmakers that the Land Commission is inundated with diverse land issues despite the accomplishments that have been made regarding land policy and land law reform.He said the issue of land rights and security of tenure is fundamental to how Liberians relate to their communities and how they view themselves as citizens of Liberia as underpinned in the Constitution.Dr. Brandy told the Lawmakers that in spite of the many positive strides the Land Commission continues to make, budgetary support to implement planned programs and projects remains a challenge, to the point where Commissioners and senior staff have not received scratch cards and gasoline since 2012.He pleaded with the Lawmakers to utilize their lobbying skills and encourage their colleagues to pass into law, the Land Rights Bill, which was submitted to the National Legislature by President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf in December 2014.In separate remarks, the Senators and Representatives pointed out that it was their pleasing duty and oversight responsibility to attend such an interactive forum where they gained valuable insight of the draft Bill and learned lessons about the Commission that will guide them in not only passing the Bill into law, but also making decisions regarding budgetary allotment to the Commission given the high volume of work it has been entrusted to perform.They thanked the Land Commission for the excellent work being done throughout the years of existence but however expressed shock over the financial squeeze being faced by the Land Commission to do its work.They assured the Chairman and Board of Commissioners that they will use whatever means available to them to ensure that the Land Rights Bill is passed into law for the benefit of all Liberians and the nation as a whole.Representative Gabriel Smith said “Land is Life” and therefore appealed to the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning to seriously consider increasing the budgetary allotment to the Commission.Both Senator J. Gbleh-bo Brown and Representative WessehBlamoh expressed fear over boundary harmonization of counties, districts and clans, which remains a challenge for the Land Commission and the Ministry of Internal Affairs.  They emphasized that in order to avoid land conflicts; the issue of boundary harmonization should be addressed.Senators Henry W. Yallah, Commany B. Wesseh and Edward B. Dagoseh said with the exchanges of views on the draft Land Rights Bill, and with particular reference to the customary land tenure, they now have hope that Liberia is on the path to development.Representatives Lester Paye and W. SaywahDunah also expressed similar sentiments on customary land ownership and said that the land governance structure and means of acquiring customary land should be clearly defined.  The retreat produced candid exchanges of views between the LC Board of Commissioners, the legal team of Heritage Partners led by Cllr. Nagbalee Warner and legislators on the substantive portions of the Bill, particularly the customary land rights category, which recognizes the ownership rights of local communities to their land and non-mineral surface rights, including forest and water.The retreat was sponsored by the Land Commission, Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) and the World Bank and facilitated by Heritage Partners and Associates led by its Senior Managing Partner, Cllr. Nagbalee Warner, the lead drafter of the Land Rights Act.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Cummings Retires from Coca-Cola

first_imgThe Coca-Cola Company has announced the retirement of its long time executive vice president and chief administrative officer, Alexander B. Cummings Jr.The company made the announcement on December 7 in Atlanta, Georgia, the headquarters of the largest beverage company in the world.According to the company’s official website, the Liberian born chief executive’s retirement takes effect on March 31, 2016.Mr. Cummings joined The Coca-Cola Company in July, 1997 as a deputy regional manager for Nigeria. He quickly rose to become president of Coca-Cola’s Africa Group in 2001, and oversaw 56 countries until July, 2008 when he was named as the chief administrative officer.The Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of The Coca-Cola Company, Muhtar Kent, praised Mr. Cummings for his distinguished service to the company.“We thank Alex for his tireless service to growing and advancing our business in key markets around the world,” said Mr. Kent. “Alex’s legacy,” he said, “will be as a leader who focused on growth and have made us more efficient and effective. He also has a passion for our people and a vision for building sustainable communities as part of our local business. We wish him well on his retirement.” Mr. Cummings was described as an international business executive and philanthropist. According to him, as Liberia finds its bearing toward private sector development, human development and governance, it should focus on re-developing its middle class.“That is the ultimate test. A healthy, vibrant and hopeful middle class is the pulse of a successful society… a sign that it has broken free from its past. When there is a strong middle class … good things happen. The economy diversifies. Instability diminishes. Lives improve. Markets emerge. And government is called to account by the expectations of an empowered people,” he said. When he delivered the keynote address on Saturday, December 5, at the annual gala of the Checago Bright Foundation in Clarksville, Maryland, Cummings expressed the belief that Liberia can aspire to regain its middle class like the rest of the world, adding: “It is going to take a break with history”At the gala, which was attended by Liberians and friends of Liberia to support and raise funds for the Checago Bright Foundation which undertakes water, sanitation and health projects in Liberia, Cummings called for Liberians to dedicate part of their lives, comforts and remittances to the rebuilding of the country.Turning to the issue of corruption, Cummings emphasized that “it is absolutely imperative that corruption is driven out of government, and driven out of the lives of Liberians.” Citing that there has been some improvement in the national life of the country, he however, strongly noted that “the scourge of corruption still infects the highest level of commerce and the smallest transaction daily in the public and private lives of our people.”Amidst repeated applauses, Cummings named clarity, cooperation and conviction as three positive forces that can bring Liberia together.Meanwhile, Mr. Cummings said that if Liberians desire to predict the future of their country, they must work in creating that future. He told Liberians at a town hall style meeting in Maryland that helping to rebuild Liberia was their patriotic and moral duty.He said he is consulting Liberians on how, together, solutions can be developed for the many issues Liberia is grappling with. He was questioned for about 90 minutes by Liberians on a wide range of topics including national security, health, agriculture and education. He spoke of the formation of his Cummings Africa Foundation, which is positively impacting the lives of people in Liberia. He says he is committed to returning to Liberia to continue helping with the rebuilding process of “Mama Liberia.”The program was organized by the local Team Cummings for Liberia (TCL), a local grass-root organization which is courting Alex Cummings to consider taking on a future leadership role in Liberia.It can be recalled that in late October, Cummings told the Daily Observer that Liberians, both at home and in the Diaspora, have petitioned him to run for the office of President of Liberia come 2017, but on each occasion put the petition on hold.“I have received the petitions, but insisted that as vice head of a premier multilateral corporation, I could not seek political office now,” he repeated. He did not, however, rule out the possibility that he may in the near future give consideration to those petitions.However, with the announcement of his retirement, the public has the cause to believe he will now accept the petitions to contest the 2017 Presidential and Legislative Elections.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Giants in arts, politics, business exit stage

first_imgNEW YORK – Former first lady Lady Bird Johnson outlived her husband, Lyndon, by more than 35 years, expanding on her White House efforts to carve her own legacy as an environmentalist. When she died July 11 at age 94, she left behind countless miles of scenic highways across the United States, dotted not by billboards and junkyards but by wildflowers. She is one of the political figures, artists, businessmen and heroes to whom we said goodbye in 2007. Two charismatic but flawed leaders, Russia’s Boris Yeltsin and Pakistan’s Benazir Bhutto, aimed to bring democracy to their homelands. Wally Schirra reached for the stars as one of the original team of Mercury astronauts. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan ClarksonWe lost authors Norman Mailer, Kurt Vonnegut and David Halberstam – three men whose writings were shaped by war and found eager audiences in the Vietnam era. The music world mourned Beverly Sills and Luciano Pavarotti, who appealed to the masses as well as opera buffs; the great classical cellist Mstislav Rostropovich; drummer Max Roach and pianist Oscar Peterson, hailed as geniuses by fellow jazzmen; and rock ‘n’ roll pioneer Ike Turner. Directors Ingmar Bergman and Michelangelo Antonioni – Europeans who championed the art of cinema rather than Hollywood glitter – died on the same day. We also lost the Senegalese director Sembene Ousmane, a film pioneer in Africa. In terms of cable news interest, the death of model-reality TV star Anna Nicole Smith overshadowed just about anyone else’s. Other colorful newsmakers who died included daredevil Evel Knievel and “queen of mean” Leona Helmsley. Their styles differed, but the Rev. Jerry Falwell and Tammy Faye Messner both brought their religious faith to bear on the wider world. The sports world said goodbye to longtime Grambling coach Eddie Robinson, Hall of Fame jockey Bill Hartack and to NFL players Darrent Williams and Sean Taylor, both shot to death before their 25th birthday. In business, we lost the founders or co-founders of Nasdaq, the Gallo wine-making empire, Bob Evans restaurants, Motel 6 and the Body Shop, the environmental cosmetics chain. The political world lost former Sens. Thomas Eagleton and George Smathers, as well as Watergate figure E. Howard Hunt. Columnists Art Buchwald and Molly Ivins brightened their writing with humor but never forgot the serious side of life. Here, a roll call of some of the notables who died in 2007. (Cause of death cited for younger people if available.) JANUARY Teddy Kollek, 95. Six-term mayor of Jerusalem; tried to balance needs of Jewish and Arab populations. Jan. 2. Vincent Sardi Jr., 91. Consummate host of Broadway watering hole Sardi’s. Jan. 4. Yvonne De Carlo, 84. The vampire mom on “The Munsters.” Jan. 8. Carlo Ponti, 94. Italian producer who discovered – and married – Sophia Loren. Jan. 9. Art Buchwald, 81. Pulitzer-winning humorist who skewered Washington’s elite. Jan. 17. Denny Doherty, 66. Member of 1960s folk-rock group the Mamas and the Papas (“California Dreamin’.”) Jan. 19. George A. Smathers, 93. Three-term Florida senator, friend to presidents. Jan. 20. Abbe Pierre, 94. Beloved French priest praised for devotion to the needy. Jan. 22. E. Howard Hunt, 88. Helped organize the Watergate break-in. Jan. 23. The Rev. Robert Drinan, 86. Priest who represented Massachusetts in the U.S. House during the 1970s. Jan. 28. Gordon S. Macklin, 79. A founder and longtime president of Nasdaq stock market. Jan. 30. Sidney Sheldon, 89. Stage, screen writer turned best-selling novelist (“The Other Side of Midnight.”) Jan. 30. Molly Ivins, 62. Best-selling author, columnist, a sharp-witted liberal who referred to President Bush as “Shrub.” Jan. 31. FEBRUARY Gian Carlo Menotti, 95. Pulitzer-winning Italian composer (“The Consul,” “Amahl and the Night Visitors”); founded Spoleto arts festivals. Feb. 1. Frankie Laine, 93. Big-voiced singer; one of the most popular entertainers of the 1950s (“That Lucky Old Sun.”) Feb. 6. Anna Nicole Smith, 39. Model and sometime actress. Feb. 8. Accidental overdose of medication. Robert Adler, 93. Co-inventor of the TV remote, the 1956 Zenith Space Command. Feb. 15. Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., 89. Pulitzer-winning historian; Kennedy administration “court philosopher.” Feb. 28. MARCH Thomas Eagleton, 77. Former senator who resigned as George McGovern’s running mate in 1972 after it was revealed he had been hospitalized for depression. March 4. Ernest Gallo, 97. With his brother, built the world’s largest winemaking empire. March 6. Betty Hutton, 86. Singer-actress who brought brassy vitality to Hollywood musicals (“Annie Get Your Gun.”) March 11. Bowie Kuhn, 80. Baseball commissioner during development of free agency, multimillion-dollar contracts. March 15. John Backus, 82. Developer of Fortran programming language that changed how people interacted with computers. March 17. G.E. Patterson, 67. Presiding bishop of million-member Church of God in Christ. March 20. Robert E. Petersen, 80. Publisher whose Hot Rod, Motor Trend magazines helped shape car culture. March 23. APRIL William Becker, 85. Co-founded the Motel 6 chain. April 2. Eddie Robinson, 88. Longtime Grambling coach; transformed small college into a football power. April 3. Johnny Hart, 76. Cartoonist whose “B.C.” showed the Stone Age’s humorous side. April 7. Kurt Vonnegut, 84. Novelist who captured the absurdity of the world in darkly humorous works such as “Slaughterhouse-Five.” April 11. Don Ho, 76. Hawaiian crooner (“Tiny Bubbles”); entertained tourists. April 14. Kitty Carlisle Hart, 96. Singer-actress; long career spanned Broadway, opera, television and film (“A Night at the Opera.”) April 17. Helen Robson Walton, 87. Widow of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton; philanthropist. April 19. David Halberstam, 73. Journalist whose acclaimed books included towering study of Vietnam War, poignant portrait of aging baseball stars. April 23. Boris Yeltsin, 76. Former Russian president who helped bring demise of Soviet Union. April 23. Warren Avis, 92. Founded Avis Rent A Car. April 24. Jack Valenti, 85. Film industry lobbyist; instituted modern movie ratings system. April 26. Mstislav Rostropovich, 80. The ebullient master cellist who fought for the rights of Soviet-era dissidents. April 27. Tom Poston, 85. The tall, pasty-faced TV comic whose characters were clueless. (“Newhart.”) April 30. MAY Walter M. Schirra Jr., 84. An original Mercury Seven astronaut, who combined the Right Stuff with a pronounced rebellious streak. May 3. The Rev. Jerry Falwell, 73. Evangelist who used the power of television to transform the religious right into a mighty political force. May 15. Charles Nelson Reilly, 76. Tony Award winner; became known for his ribald TV game show appearances. May 25. Barbara Cox Anthony, 84. Heiress to the Cox media fortune; one of the world’s richest women. May 28. JUNE Bill France Jr., 74. Transformed NASCAR into a billion-dollar conglomerate. June 4. Sen. Craig Thomas, 74. Three-term Senate Republican; reliably represented conservative Wyoming. June 4. Sembene Ousmane, 84. Father of Senegalese cinema; one of the pioneers of the art in Africa. June 9. Don Herbert, 89. Television’s “Mr. Wizard.” June 12. Ruth Graham, 87. Billy Graham’s closest confidante, providing a solid foundation for her husband’s evangelism career. June 14. Kurt Waldheim, 88. U.N. secretary-general; Austrian president; was revealed to have been in German army unit that committed atrocities in World War II. June 14. Gianfranco Ferre, 62. Italian designer known as “architect of fashion.” June 17. Bob Evans, 89. Created namesake restaurant chain. June 21. Charles W. Lindberg, 86. Helped raise first American flag over Iwo Jima. June 24. Liz Claiborne, 78. Her fashion designs became a cornerstone of career women’s wardrobes. June 26. JULY Beverly Sills, 78. Opera diva with a dazzling voice, bubbly personality. July 2. Kathleen E. Woodiwiss, 68. Pioneer of modern historical romance novel (“The Flame and the Flower.”) July 6. Doug Marlette, 57. Pulitzer-winning editorial cartoonist, creator of comic strip “Kudzu.” July 10. Car accident. Lady Bird Johnson, 94. Former first lady who championed conservation and worked tenaciously for the political career of her husband, Lyndon B. Johnson. July 11. Tammy Faye Messner, 65. Helped then-husband Jim Bakker build a TV evangelism empire that collapsed in disgrace. July 20. Mohammad Zahir Shah, 92. Afghanistan’s last king, who oversaw four decades of peace before a 1973 coup. July 23. Tom Snyder, 71. Late-late night TV talk show host with a robust laugh, trademark cloud of cigarette smoke. July 29. Bill Walsh, 75. San Francisco 49ers coach, won three Super Bowls. July 30. Ingmar Bergman, 87. Swedish filmmaker; one of the greatest artists in cinema history (“The Seventh Seal,” “Cries and Whispers.”) July 30. Michelangelo Antonioni, 94. Italian filmmaker whose depiction of modern-day malaise made him a symbol of art-house cinema (“Blow-Up,” “L’Avventura.”) July 30. AUGUST Irene Morgan Kirkaldy, 90. A black woman whose refusal to give up her bus seat led to a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision in the 1940s. Aug. 10. Merv Griffin, 82. Singer turned TV host turned impresario who parlayed game shows into a multimillion-dollar empire. Aug. 12. Brooke Astor, 105. Philanthropist who gave millions to New York City institutions, large and small. Aug. 13. Phil Rizzuto, 89. Hall of Fame Yankee shortstop; sportscaster much loved for exclaiming “Holy cow!” Aug. 13. Max Roach, 83. Jazz drummer whose rhythmic innovations defined bebop. Aug. 16. Michael K. Deaver, 69. Adviser to Ronald Reagan who directed the president’s picturesque public appearances. Aug. 18. Leona Helmsley, 87. Ran a $5 billion real estate empire with her husband but became known as the “queen of mean” during her 1989 tax evasion trial. Aug. 20. Grace Paley, 84. Acclaimed poet and short story writer. Aug. 22. Hilly Kristal, 75. His Manhattan club CBGB served as birthplace of punk rock. Aug. 28. Miyoshi Umeki, 78. Oscar-winning actress (“Sayonara.”) Aug. 28. Richard Jewell, 44. Former security guard wrongly linked to 1996 Olympic bombing in Atlanta. Aug. 29. Heart disease. SEPTEMBER The Rev. D. James Kennedy, 76. Megachurch pastor; one of the nation’s most prominent Christian broadcasters. Sept. 5. Luciano Pavarotti, 71. Opera superstar hailed as “king of the high C’s.” Sept. 6. Madeleine L’Engle, 88. Author who captivated children with “A Wrinkle in Time.” Sept. 6. Jane Wyman, 90. Won Oscar as deaf rape victim in “Johnny Belinda”; later in TV’s “Falcon Crest.” Ronald Reagan’s ex-wife. Sept. 10. Anita Roddick, 64. Founded eco-friendly beauty retailer The Body Shop. Sept. 10. The Rev. Rex Humbard, 88. His televangelism ministry once spanned the globe. Sept. 21. Marcel Marceau, 84. French master of pantomime who transformed silence into poetry. Sept. 22. Harry Dent, 77. Top adviser to President Nixon; helped him win the South. Sept. 28. OCTOBER James W. Michaels, 86. Transformed business journalism as Forbes magazine editor. Oct. 2. Deborah Kerr, 86. Actress who kissed Burt Lancaster on a beach in “From Here to Eternity” and danced with Yul Brynner in “The King and I.” Oct. 16. Barbara West Dainton, 96. Englishwoman believed to be one of the last two survivors from the Titanic. Oct. 16. Joey Bishop, 89. Stone-faced TV and nightclub comedian; last of the Rat Pack. Oct. 17. Catherine Roraback, 87. Attorney who won 1965 Supreme Court that established the right to contraceptives and privacy. Oct. 17. Dr. Arthur Kornberg, 89. His test-tube synthesis of DNA earned him a Nobel Prize in 1959. Oct. 26. Porter Wagoner, 80. Grand Ole Opry star who helped launch the career of Dolly Parton. Oct. 28. Robert Goulet, 73. Baritone made Broadway debut in “Camelot;” won Tony in 1968 for “The Happy Time.” Oct. 30. NOVEMBER Paul Tibbets, 92. Piloted the B-29 that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. Nov. 1. Norman Mailer, 84. The pugnacious prince of American letters. Nov. 10. The Rev. John H. Cross Jr., 82. Pastor of church in Birmingham, Ala., where four girls died in a 1963 racist bombing. Nov. 15. Dick Wilson, 91. Played the fussy, mustachioed grocer who begged customers “Please, don’t squeeze the Charmin.” Nov. 19. Ian Smith, 88. Rhodesia’s last white prime minister; his attempts to resist black rule brought isolation and civil war. Nov. 20. Herbert Saffir, 90. Engineer; created the five-category system to describe hurricane strength. Nov. 21. Dr. J. Robert Cade, 80. Inventor of Gatorade. Nov. 27. Bill Hartack, 74. Hall of Fame jockey; one of only two to win five Kentucky Derbys. Nov. 26. Henry Hyde, 83. Illinois congressman who steered impeachment proceedings against President Clinton. Nov. 29. Roger B. Smith, 82. Led General Motors Corp.; was subject of Michael Moore’s documentary “Roger & Me.” Nov. 29. Evel Knievel, 69. Motorcycle daredevil known for spectacular jumps and bone-crushing crashes. Nov. 30. DECEMBER Karlheinz Stockhausen, 79. Avant-garde German composer; pioneer of electronic music. Dec. 5. Roger M. King, 63. CBS and King World Productions executive; helped bring such stars as Oprah Winfrey to television. Dec. 8. Ike Turner, 76. Rock innovator who teamed with wife Tina Turner (and denied abusing her). Dec. 12. Dan Fogelberg, 56. His gentle, poignant hits (“Longer,” “Leader of the Band”) helped define soft-rock. Dec. 16. Cancer. J. Russell Coffey, 109. Oldest known surviving U.S. veteran of World War I. Dec. 20. Ken Hendricks, 66. His ABC Supply Co., a roofing and siding supply company, made him a billionaire. Dec. 21. Michael Kidd, 92. Choreographer whose athletic dances (“Seven Brides for Seven Brothers”) won him five Tonys and a special Oscar. Dec. 23. Oscar Peterson, 82. Jazz pianist whose hard-driving swing and melodic improvisations were hugely influential. Dec. 23. Benazir Bhutto, 54. Former Pakistan prime minister who returned from exile to challenge the current leader, Pervez Musharraf. Dec. 27. Assassinated.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Bush approves pension overhaul

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREFrumpy Middle-aged Mom: My realistic 2020 New Year’s resolutions. Some involve doughnuts.He added a stern instruction to corporate America. “You should keep the promises you make to your workers,” the president said. “If you offer a private pension plan to your employees, you have a duty to set aside enough money now so your workers will get what they’ve been promised when they retire.” At the same time, the law recognizes the evolution in workers’ benefits – a gradual disappearance of pensions in favor of savings accounts such as 401(k)s that require workers to amass their own retirement savings. Those accounts, also known as defined contribution plans, got a boost in the new law. It is this step that many expect will do the most over time to help people working toward retirement. The law lets employers automatically enroll workers in 401(k) plans. In addition, there is a mechanism to increase gradually the amount saved, and employers are encouraged to match some of the dollars that workers stash away. A nonprofit research organization, the Retirement Security Project, estimated that the change, when fully in effect, could mean employees will save an additional $10 billion to $15 billion in 401(k) accounts each year. WASHINGTON – President George W. Bush signed a broad overhaul of pension and savings rules Thursday, giving millions of people a better chance of getting the retirement benefits they have earned. The law, passed with fanfare by Congress two weeks ago, gives companies seven years to shore up funding of their traditional pensions, also known as defined benefit plans. Special rules for seriously underfunded companies require them to catch up faster. The 30,000 such plans run by employers are estimated to be underfunded by $450 billion. “Americans who spent a lifetime working hard should be confident that their pensions will be there when they retire,” Bush said. “Those additional contributions will bolster retirement security for millions of workers,” said Peter Orszag, director of the project, which works for low- and middle-income workers.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Lucas Moura’s superb hat-trick seals 4-0 win for Spurs over Huddersfield

first_img Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester stars REVEALED shining Mauricio Pochettino made seven changes to his team with only Hugo Lloris, Jan Vertonghen, Moussa Sissoko and Christian Eriksen the survivors from their Champions League win over Manchester City.Son Heung-min, who has scored two of Spurs’ three goals at their new stadium, was on the bench. Berahino hits back at b******t Johnson criticism – ‘I was in a dark place at Stoke’ ADVICE Despite missing Harry Kane, Dele Alli and Son, Tottenham were a threat up front and took the lead after 24 minutes.Fernando Llorente spun his marker but could not control the ball and it fell nicely into the path of Wanyama, who coolly rounded the goalkeeper to slot home.Spurs doubled their lead three minutes later when Moura latched onto a through ball from Moussa Sissoko and arrowed a shot into the bottom left-hand corner. REVEALED Ronaldo warned Lukaku how hard scoring goals in Serie A would be before Inter move Jon Stankovic had Huddersfield’s best chance of the half after 30 minutes when he headed wide from a set piece and should have done better.Spurs went into the break 2-0 up and largely untroubled by the visitors.Llorente came close to adding a third soon after half-time when the striker broke free in the area and his volley struck the crossbar. Tottenham Hotspur kept up their 100 per cent record at their new stadium with a 4-0 win over Huddersfield on Saturday.Goals from Victor Wanyama and a Lucas Moura hat-trick saw Spurs move back up to third in the Premier League with the three points.It is three back-to-back victories at the new arena and they are still to concede in front of their home fans. 3 huge blow Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions center_img Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won 3 Huddersfield did not make life easy for the home side in the last 15 minutes, though, as they had a number of chances to get themselves back into the game.Steve Mounie curled a header inches past the right-hand upright while Karlan Grant raced through on goal before a vital challenge was made.Lloris was forced into a good save in the 80th minute when Juninho Bacuna’s 30-yard free-kick was heading for the top corner.Moura wrapped up the points for Tottenham with his second goal of the game two minutes from time, smartly controlling Eriksen’s low cross with one foot before using the other to fire past Ben Hamer.He then completed his hat-trick in the final minute of the match with another superb finish. LATEST FOOTBALL NEWS Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury REPLY no dice Son ban confirmed as Tottenham fail with appeal to overturn red card 3 Fernando Llorente sees his shot crash against the bar Lucas Moura scored Tottenham’s second Victor Wanyama opened the scoring BEST OF last_img read more

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Patoka Lake dove hunt drawings are Sept. 1

first_imgThe second drawing is an age 17 or younger hunt at the former R.A. Walton Farm in Crawford County at the R.A. Walton Farm Hunter Check Station #11 parking area. Hunting hours will be the same as for Jackson SRA. Six to eight groups will be drawn for this hunt.Both hunts will have a maximum of two hunters per stake. All fields surrounding the controlled sunflower fields at both locations will have the same hours.There will be no “stand-by” or refilling of shooting stations if there are early departures at either property. All fields will be considered open hunting starting Sept. 2. Shooting hours will be a half hour before sunrise until sunset.Hunters need to purchase the proper licenses and stamps and have their Federal Harvest Information Program (HIP) number. Patoka Lake adult hunters will be limited to 50 shells, and youth hunters will be limited to 75 shells. Hunters must use size 6 or smaller non-toxic shot and are required to have their firearm plugged so it can only contain three shells at a time.Tillery Hill SRA will host a non-draw hunt opportunity on Sept. 1. There will be a 3-acre field at Hunter Check Station #6, and a two-acre field near Osborne Boat Ramp on W. Newton Stewart Road.Hunters are strongly encouraged to wear blaze orange clothing for safety as other users may be in the fields and area.Patoka Lake (on.IN.gov/patokalake) is at 3084 N. Dillard Road, Birdseye, IN 47513. Patoka Lake is hosting two in-person drawings for controlled dove hunts and a non-draw hunt opportunity, all on Sept. 1.Both drawings will be at 6 a.m. and have hunting hours of 6:30 a.m. to noon.The first dove hunt drawing will be at Jackson State Recreation Area in Orange County in the Wildcat Cove Hunter Check Station #17 parking area. Around 15 to 20 groups are expected to be drawn.last_img read more

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Attraction Overview: Expedition Everest + Video

first_imgShare This!Have you heard about the mysterious monster rumored to protect the Himalaya Mountains?Dare to catch a glimpse?Board an old train and travel to the top of Mount Everest to see if the legend is true!Which attraction would you like me to cover next? Let me know in the comments!last_img

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Where are they now: Local athletes playing college basketball

first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterA number of former local high school athletes have moved on to the next level and are playing collegiate sports across the country. Periodically, Hub City Times will publish a college sports roundup, updating readers of some of those athletes’ exploits.This week take a look at what three recent area high school grads are doing on the basketball court at colleges around the Midwest.Baierl playing hoops in OhioBaierlAbby Baierl, a 2016 graduate of Marshfield Columbus Catholic High School, is a freshman on the Franciscan University women’s basketball team in Steubenville, Ohio.Baierl has started seven of the Barrons’ nine games this season and averages 8.6 points per contest, which is second on the team.Baierl is shooting a team-best 38.9 percent from 3-point range (14 of 36) and 91.7 percent from the free throw line (11 of 12).Franciscan is a NCAA Division III school that competes in the Allegeny Mountain Collegiate Conference. The Barrons are 1-8 overall and 1-3 in the conference so far this season.Scheuer kicks off career at Bemidji StateScheuer2016 Marshfield High School graduate McKayla Scheuer is a freshman on the Bemidji State University women’s basketball team in Bemidji, Minnesota.Scheuer has played in four of the Beavers’ eight games so far this season, scoring four points in 12 total minutes.Scheuer, a 5-foot-8 guard, had two points in games against Mayville State on Nov. 12 and Northland College on Nov. 18.Bemidji State, an NCAA Division II school, was 3-5 overall and 0-4 in the Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference heading into its game at Minnesota-Crookston on Thursday. Scheuer’s former Marshfield teammate Caitlin Michaelis plays for Crookston.Fravert debuts at UW-OshkoshFravertAdam Fravert, who graduated in 2016 from Marshfield High School, is playing on the men’s basketball team at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh.Fravert has played in the Titans’ last three games after sitting out their opening five contests.Fravert, a first-team all-Wisconsin Valley Conference selection a year ago for Marshfield, has not scored in four combined minutes thus far for Oshkosh.Oshkosh is 5-3 heading into a nonconference game at home against St. Norbert College on Dec. 20 and is riding a three-game winning streak.last_img read more

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Feeding the gods: Hundreds of skulls reveal massive scale of human sacrifice in Aztec capital

first_img 0 The priest quickly sliced into the captive’s torso and removed his still-beating heart. That sacrifice, one among thousands performed in the sacred city of Tenochtitlan, would feed the gods and ensure the continued existence of the world.Death, however, was just the start of the victim’s role in the sacrificial ritual, key to the spiritual world of the Mexica people in the 14th to the 16th centuries.Priests carried the body to another ritual space, where they laid it face-up. Armed with years of practice, detailed anatomical knowledge, and obsidian blades sharper than today’s surgical steel, they made an incision in the thin space between two vertebrae in the neck, expertly decapitating the body. Using their sharp blades, the priests deftly cut away the skin and muscles of the face, reducing it to a skull. Then, they carved large holes in both sides of the skull and slipped it onto a thick wooden post that held other skulls prepared in precisely the same way. The skulls were bound for Tenochtitlan’s tzompantli, an enormous rack of skulls built in front of the Templo Mayor—a pyramid with two temples on top. One was dedicated to the war god, Huitzilopochtli, and the other to the rain god, Tlaloc.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Eventually, after months or years in the sun and rain, a skull would begin to fall to pieces, losing teeth and perhaps even its jaw. The priests would remove it to be fashioned into a mask and placed in an offering, or use mortar to add it to two towers of skulls that flanked the tzompantli. For the Aztecs—the larger cultural group to which the Mexica belonged—those skulls were the seeds that would ensure the continued existence of humanity. They were a sign of life and regeneration, like the first flowers of spring.But the Spanish conquistadors who marched into Tenochtitlan in 1519 saw them differently. For them, the skulls—and the entire practice of human sacrifice—evinced the Mexica’s barbarism and justified laying waste to the city in 1521. The Spanish tore down the Templo Mayor and the tzompantli in front of it, paved over the ruins, and built what would become Mexico City. And the great rack and towers of skulls passed into the realm of historical mystery. Some researchers also argue that killing captives or subjects both establishes and reinforces hierarchy in large, complex societies. A 2016 Nature paper, for example, linked human sacrifice to the development of social stratification in dozens of traditional Austronesian cultures.Many researchers say that, for the Mexica, political power as well as religious belief is likely key to understanding the scale of the practice. Theirs was a relatively young empire; during their 200-year reign, they conquered territory all over central and southern Mexico, sometimes facing tremendous resistance from local communities (some of which would later ally with the Spanish against the empire). Spanish chronicles describe Tenochtitlan’s sacrificial victims as captives brought back from wars, such as those fought with their archenemy, the nearby republic of Tlaxcala. Subject peoples in the Mexica Empire were also sometimes required to send individuals as tribute. “The killing of captives, even in a ritual context, is a strong political statement,” Verano says. “It’s a way to demonstrate power and political influence—and, some people have said, it’s a way to control your own population.””The more powerful a state was, the more victims it could dedicate,” says Ximena Chávez Balderas, an INAH bioarchaeologist who spent years studying the remains of sacrificial victims in offerings in the Templo Mayor; she is now Verano’s doctoral student at Tulane. The religious significance and political messaging of human sacrifice “go hand in hand,” she says.Over two seasons of excavations, INAH archaeologists collected 180 mostly complete skulls from the tower as well as thousands of skull fragments. Now, those finds sit in a lab next to the Templo Mayor ruins, being painstakingly examined by a team led by INAH anthropologist Jorge Gómez Valdés. Cut marks on the skulls leave no doubt they were defleshed after death, and the decapitation technique appears clean and uniform. “[Mexica priests] had extremely impressive anatomical knowledge, which was passed down from generation to generation,” Chávez Balderas says. Sacrifice city For the Mexica, human sacrifice was key to the health of the world. Recent finds show that a vast rack of skulls (reconstruction below) stood in a temple at the heart of their capital, Tenochtitlan. (An interactive version of this graphic is also available.) 1587 AZTEC MANUSCRIPT, THE CODEX TOVAR/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) archaeologists collected nearly 200 skulls from the tower flanking the tzompantli. Isotope and DNA studies, now underway, are expected to reveal that victims came from all over Mesoamerica. By Lizzie WadeJun. 21, 2018 , 2:00 PM Km Nearby, the researchers also found skulls apparently stuck together with mortar—remnants of one of the towers flanking the tzompantli, where most skulls once exhibited on its posts ended their postmortem journey. The team spent a second season, from October 2016 to June 2017, excavating the tzompantli and the tower. At its largest, the tower was nearly 5 meters in diameter and at least 1.7 meters tall. Combining the two historically documented towers and the rack, INAH archaeologists now estimate that several thousand skulls must have been displayed at a time.Other Mesoamerican cultures also engaged in human sacrifice and built tzompantlis. But, “The Mexica certainly brought this to an extreme,” says Vera Tiesler, a bioarchaeologist at the Autonomous University of Yucatán in Mérida, Mexico. In her work at the Mayan city of Chichen Itza, founded some 700 years before Tenochtitlan and more than 1000 kilometers away, she found six skulls with holes in their sides that she suspects were once displayed on the posts of a tzompantli. However, the holes in each skull were less regular and uniform than those in the Tenochtitlan skulls. “That makes me think it was not a standardized practice yet,” she says. “Tenochtitlan was the maximum expression [of the tzompantli tradition].”Human sacrifice occupied a particularly important place in Mesoamerica. Many of the region’s cultures, including the Maya and the Mexica, believed that human sacrifice nourished the gods. Without it, the sun would cease to rise and the world would end. And sacrificial victims earned a special, honored place in the afterlife.Ritual killings in traditional cultures elsewhere in the world, including Asia and Europe, point to additional roles for the practice, and may help explain why the Mexica took it to such an extreme. “All premodern societies make some kind of offering,” Verano says. “And in many societies, if not all, the most valuable sacrifice is human life.” Social scientists who study religion have shown that costly offerings and painful rituals, such as the bloodletting ceremonies the Mexica also practiced, can help define and strengthen group identity—especially in societies that have grown too large for everyone to know everyone else. Some of the skulls displayed on the tzompantli were transformed into masks; this one’s nose is an obsidian blade like those used in human sacrifice. Aztec road system 16th century lakes Modern Mexico City urban area Mexica-era settlements Templecomplex 5 m 14 m 36 m The Mexica expertly decapitated victims and carved standardized holes in the sides of their skulls so they could be mounted onto the posts of a rack called the tzompantli, which heldthousands of skulls. (GRAPHIC) C. BICKEL AND A. CUADRA/SCIENCE; (MAP) ADAPTED FROM “CARTA GEOGRÁFICA DEL DISTRITO FEDERAL” (1899) AND “CARTA HIDROGRÁFICA DEL VALLE DE MÉXICO” (1900) Gomóz Valdás found that about 75% of the skulls examined so far belonged to men, most between the ages of 20 and 35—prime warrior age. But 20% were women, and 5% belonged to children. Most victims seemed to be in relatively good health before they were sacrificed. “If they are war captives, they aren’t randomly grabbing the stragglers,” Gómez Valdés says. The mix of ages and sexes also supports another Spanish claim, that many victims were slaves sold in the city’s markets expressly to be sacrificed.Chávez Balderas identified a similar distribution of sex and age in her studies of victims in smaller offerings within the Templo Mayor itself, which often contained skulls from the tzompantli that had been decorated and turned into eerie masks. Her colleagues also analyzed isotopes of strontium and oxygen that the teeth and bones had absorbed. The isotopes in teeth reflect the geology of a person’s surroundings during childhood, whereas isotopes in bones show where a person lived before death. The results confirmed that the victims were born in various parts of Mesoamerica but had often spent significant time in Tenochtitlan before they were sacrificed. “They aren’t foreigners who were brought into the city and directly to the ritual,” Chávez Balderas says. “They were assimilated into the society of Tenochtitlan in some way.” Barrera Rodríguez says some historical accounts record cases of captive warriors living with the families of their captors for months or years before being sacrificed.Samples for isotopic analysis as well as ancient DNA studies have already been taken from many of the tzompantli skulls, Gómez Valdés says. He, too, expects to find a diversity of origins, especially because the tzompantli skulls display a variety of intentional dental and cranial modifications, which were practiced by different cultural groups at different times. If so, the skulls could yield information that extends far beyond how the victims died. “Hypothetically, in this tzompantli, you have a sample of the population from all over Mesoamerica,” Vázquez Vallín says. “It’s unparalleled.”Bioarchaeologist Tiffiny Tung of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, who studies human sacrifice in the Andes, says she is excited to see what the INAH team can learn from the skulls about sacrificial rituals and the genetic diversity of Mesoamerica just before the conquest. “We can go down literally to the individual person and tell that person’s story. And then we can pull back and tell the story … about these big communities,” she says. Once imbued with a sacred, but silent, role in the city where they died, those victims may finally speak again. Some conquistadors wrote about the tzompantli and its towers, estimating that the rack alone contained 130,000 skulls. But historians and archaeologists knew the conquistadors were prone to exaggerating the horrors of human sacrifice to demonize the Mexica culture. As the centuries passed, scholars began to wonder whether the tzompantli had ever existed.Archaeologists at the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) here can now say with certainty that it did. Beginning in 2015, they discovered and excavated the remains of the skull rack and one of the towers underneath a colonial period house on the street that runs behind Mexico City’s cathedral. (The other tower, they suspect, lies under the cathedral’s back courtyard.) The scale of the rack and tower suggests they held thousands of skulls, testimony to an industry of human sacrifice unlike any other in the world. Now, archaeologists are beginning to study the skulls in detail, hoping to learn more about Mexica rituals and the postmortem treatment of the bodies of the sacrificed. The researchers also wonder who the victims were, where they lived, and what their lives were like before they ended up marked for a brutal death at the Templo Mayor.”This is a world of information,” says archaeologist Raùl Barrera Rodríguez, director of INAH’s Urban Archaeology Program and leader of the team that found the tzompantli. “It’s an amazing thing, and just the kind of discovery many of us had hoped for,” agrees John Verano, a bioarchaeologist at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, who studies human sacrifice. He and other researchers hope the skulls will clarify the role of large-scale human sacrifice in Mexica religion and culture—and whether, as scholars suspect, it played a key part in building their empire.The discovery of the tzompantli began the same way all the Urban Archaeology Program’s digs do: with a planned construction project in the heart of downtown Mexico City. Whenever someone wants to build in a seven-block area around the Templo Mayor, Barrera Rodríguez’s team must excavate first, salvaging whatever remains of the colonial and especially Mexica city beneath. The finds are often significant and surprisingly intact. The Templo Mayor itself came to light in the 1970s, when INAH archaeologists were called in after city electrical workers stumbled on an imposing circular statue of the goddess Coyolxauhqui, who was killed and dismembered by her brother Huitzilopochtli. LakeXaltocan Mortar andfill center Ring ofsacrificedskulls LakeTexcoco LakeXochimilco Sierra Nevada Iztaccihuatlvolcano Skull rack Skull tower SierraChichinautzin 2 Tzompantli The Mexica built their capital city on an island in the now-drained Lake Texcoco. At its apex, the city had a population of about 250,000 and was the seat of an empire that stretched to southern Mexico. The temple complex in the middle of the island was the political and religious heart of the city state. The island capital of Tenochtitlan Most sacrifices in Tenochtitlan were performed inpublic at the top of the Templo Mayor. The sacrificesplayed a vital role in the Mexica’s cosmology,and may have also helped the young empire control conquered populations. 1 Templo Mayor Built from skulls and mortar, towers at least 1.7 meters tall and likely taller flanked the tzompantli. These were built in phases, with skulls on the outer rings facing out ward, and those on the inner rings facing inward. 3 Two towers RAÚL BARRERA RODRÍGUEZ Archaeologists have now discovered and excavated the remains of tzompantli. A codex written after the conquest by a Spanish priest depicts Tenochtitlan’s enormous skull rack, or tzompantli. MOSTARDI PHOTOGRAPHY/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO 20 Feeding the gods: Hundreds of skulls reveal massive scale of human sacrifice in Aztec capital Much of the temple had survived to be discovered. The Mexica built it in seven phases between 1325 and 1521, each corresponding to the reign of a king. Each phase was built over and around the earlier ones, embedding the Templo Mayor’s history within it like a set of Russian nesting dolls. Although the Spanish destroyed the temple’s final phase, the smaller temples from earlier reigns were paved over but left relatively unscathed. Those ruins are now part of the Templo Mayor Museum. But many structures that surrounded the ruins remained hidden beneath the dense colonial city—and now, the modern megalopolis.So when Barrera Rodríguez got the call to excavate a site just a few buildings down from where Guatemala Street dead-ends into the Templo Mayor complex, he knew the dig could lead to a major discovery. Starting in February 2015, his team dug about 20 test pits, unearthing modern debris, colonial porcelain, and, finally, the basalt slabs of a Mexica period floor. Then, he remembers, “Hundreds of skull fragments began to appear.” In more than 2 decades of excavating in downtown Mexico City, he had never seen anything like it.Barrera Rodríguez and INAH archaeologist and field supervisor Lorena Vázquez Vallín knew from colonial maps of Tenochtitlan that the tzompantli, if it existed, could be somewhere near their dig. But they weren’t sure that’s what they were seeing until they found the postholes for the skull rack. The wooden posts themselves had long since decayed, and the skulls once displayed on them had shattered—or been purposely crushed by the conquistadors. Still, the size and spacing of the holes allowed them to estimate the tzompantli’s size: an imposing rectangular structure, 35 meters long and 12 to 14 meters wide, slightly larger than a basketball court, and likely 4 to 5 meters high. From their knowledge of the eras of the Templo Mayor, archaeologists estimate that the particular phases of the tzompantli they found were likely built between 1486 and 1502, although human sacrifice had been practiced in Tenochtitlan since its founding in 1325. HÉCTOR MONTAÑO/INAH last_img read more

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